The Law Offices of Dr. Michael M. Wilson M.D., J.D. Click here to connect to our office instantly
Understand the breakdown of a medical malpractice claim Learn how having an attorney who is also a physician can make all the difference Fill out our free consultation form and get started today
Washington DC Medical Malpractice Lawyer
Follow us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn
Subscribe to our blog feed
 Follow us on Google Plus
Medical Malpractice Blog
Areas of Practice
Bile Duct Injuries
Birth Injuries
Hospital & Doctor Negligence
Surgical Errors
Medication Errors
Diagnosis Errors
Spinal Cord Injuries
Contact Us
Name:
Email:
Phone:
Message:

Important Ruling for Walters v. People's Republic of China

A recent ruling in the Walters v. People's Republic of China case has implications for the country of China in a case that has been ongoing since 1993. This ruling indicates the power of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in such that it can order the People's Republic of China to comply with its orders or face penalties.

Waters v. People's Republic of China

In this case, Debbie Walters filed a lawsuit for product liability, breach of warranty, and negligence regarding a semi-automatic rifle made in China that killed her son when the weapon got jammed. The People's Republic of China was named in that court case, and was ordered to pay $10 million. Ever since, Walters has fought to receive the money from the People's Republic of China that that court order decreed.

In October 2009, three banks named in the lawsuit were served with notices and subpoenas requiring they release documents that detail what property in their possession the People's Republic of China has interest in and forbid the sale of that property. The banks refused, stating that they had the right not to disclose that information under the Federal Sovereign Immunities Act. The court ruled that property held by these banks outside the United States were not in the scope of FSIA and would not be immune. After this ruling, the People's Republic of China sent a letter to the court stating that they were not to be held liable to the financial court ruling of another sovereign state and were concerned about the attempt to extract the country's money.

A court ruling in October 2014 by Magistrate Judge Deborah A. Robinson held that the People's Republic of China could be subject to the contempt power of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia if they do not comply with a court order. As a result, the People's Republic of China has an opportunity to comply with the court and provide the necessary documents or they will be fined $246,000 per day.